Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research
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PAST WORKING GROUPS

Hydrology Cross-Cutting Theme
(Phase II, 2007-2012)


In Phase II of the FCE-LTER project, scientists are examining hydrologic patterns in the estuarine ecotones. They believe that increased inflows from restoration projects will: 1) shift the location of salinity mixing toward the coast; 2) suppress brackish groundwater discharge, thus changing the geochemical conditions of ecotones; and 3) reduce water residence times in the Shark River Slough ecotone, but not in the Taylor Slough ecotone since restoration will impact Taylor Slough to a lesser extent.

Researchers are taking continuous measurements of surface water levels at sites in both ecotones and are gathering data from over 40 surface water monitoring stations. They are tracking the location of the estuarine ecotones using surface water salinity data and examining groundwater salinity in wells in order to quantify the extent of seawater intrusion in the underlying aquifer from FCE LTER water quality monitoring sites.

How do these factors affect people in south Florida?
The residents of south Florida rely on drinking water from the Biscayne Aquifer. This aquifer is recharged from surface water from the Everglades. A decrease in surface water levels in the Everglades will relate to a decrease in available water for the people of south Florida. In addition, a decrease in surface water levels in the Everglades can enhance seawater intrusion into the Biscayne Aquifer, further limiting freshwater supply.

Rene Price and Tiffany Horst sampling groundwater from well E-146 for phosphorus
Rene Price and Tiffany Horst sampling groundwater from well E-146 for phosphorus

Rene Price and Tiffany Horst sampling groundwater from well E-146 for phosphorus
Rene Price and Tiffany Horst sampling groundwater from well E-146 for phosphorus

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National Science Foundation logo This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation through the Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research program under Cooperative Agreements #DEB-1237517, #DBI-0620409, and #DEB-9910514. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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