Florida Coastal Everglades Long Term Ecological Research
Florida Coastal Everglades LTER - Everglades Environmental Issues & Restoration
Environmental Issues & RestorationEnvironmental Issues & Restoration



Introduction
         Beginning in 1948 with the creation of the Central and Southern Florida (C&SF) Flood Control Project, much of the original greater Everglades ecosystem was drained in an effort to create a system of canals and dikes that would control the flow of water and accommodate agriculture and urban development. Some 50 percent of the original Everglades has been lost to agriculture and development but the majority of the remaining original Everglades acreage is now protected in a national park, national wildlife refuge, and water conservation areas. Recently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in partnership with the South Florida Water Management District and numerous other federal, state, local and tribal partners has developed a plan to save the Everglades called the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP). The Plan was approved in the Water Resources Development Act (WRDA) of 2000. It includes more than 60 elements, will take more than 30 years to construct and will cost an estimated $7.8 billion. The goal of CERP is to capture fresh water that now flows unused to the ocean and the gulf and redirect it to areas that need it most. The majority of the water will be devoted to environmental restoration, reviving a dying ecosystem. The remaining water will benefit cities and farmers by enhancing water supplies for the south Florida economy.
          We invite you to learn more about the Everglades environmental issues and restoration by exploring our listings of external Everglades issues and restoration links. Please note that these links are on websites outside of the Florida Coastal Everglades LTER website and will open in a new window.




Other LTER sites:
Website Map Privacy Policy  | En Español
National Science Foundation logo This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation through the Florida Coastal Everglades Long-Term Ecological Research program under Cooperative Agreements #DEB-1237517, #DBI-0620409, and #DEB-9910514. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in the material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
Please address questions or comments about this website to: fcelter@fiu.edu.
LTER Network logo